News & Updates

September 14, 2018

Constitutional Amendments Proposed on the November Ballot

AMENDMENT 1 - says displays of the Ten Commandments can be posted at schools and on other state and local government property, provided that they meet constitutional requirements, such as being alongside other historical and educational documents.  It says no public funds can be used to defend the law if it is challenged in court.

A “YES” vote supports amending the state constitution to authorize the display of the Ten Commandments on public property, including public schools, and establish certain religious rights. The amendment also contains a provision preventing any public funds from being spent to defend the amendment in court. 

A “NO” vote opposes amending the state constitution to authorize the display of the Ten Commandments on public property, including public schools, and establish certain religious rights.

 

AMENDMENT 2 says it’s the public policy of the state to recognize the rights of the unborn, including the right to life. It says the state Constitution does not carry a right to an abortion or public funding for abortions. It would not outlaw abortion because the constitutional right to an abortion established by the U.S. Supreme Court remains in place.

A “YES” vote supports this amendment to make it state policy to “recognize and support the sanctity of unborn life and the rights of unborn children, including the right to life” and to state that no provisions of the constitution provide a right to an abortion or require funding of abortions. 

A “NO” vote opposes this amendment to make it state policy to “recognize and support the sanctity of unborn life and the rights of unborn children, including the right to life” and to state that no provisions of the constitution provide a right to an abortion or require funding of abortions. 

 

AMENDMENT 3 concerns the makeup of the University of Alabama board of trustees. Section 264 of the Constitution requires three members from Alabama’s 7th Congressional district, which includes Tuscaloosa, and two members from each of the state’s other six districts. Amendment 3 is intended to preserve that alignment of the board if the districts change. It says membership will be based on the districts as they were on Jan. 1, 2018. There are concerns that Alabama could lose a district when the Congressional seats are reapportioned after the 2020 census.

Amendment 3 does two other things. It would remove the requirement that UA trustees retire from the board after age 70. And it would remove the state superintendent of education’s position as an ex-officio member of the board.

A “YES” vote supports amending the state constitution to make the following changes to the membership of the board of trustees of the University of Alabama:
    • remove the superintendent of education from the board;
    • establish that, for the purposes of districts for the board of trustees membership, the congressional districts in use as of January 1, 2018, would be used; and

    • remove the constitutional provision establishing an age limit of 70 for members of the board.[2]

A “NO” vote opposes amending the state constitution to make changes to the membership of the board of trustees of the University of Alabama, thereby leaving leaving the superintendent of education on the board and basing the board of trustees districts on congressional districts without freezing them as they were on January 1, 2018.[2] 

 

AMENDMENT 4 would change how vacancies in the Legislature are filled. When a vacancy occurs, the state Constitution requires the governor to call a special election. The winner fills the remainder of the term. Vacancies that occurred late in this four-year term required several special elections at the tail end of the term, including two that weren’t decided until May. That was just a month before primaries for the next full, four-year term. Amendment 4 would change the Constitution to say that vacancies that happen Oct. 1 or later in the third year of a four-year term would not be filled until the next regular election.

A “YES” vote supports amending the state constitution to establish the following:
    • if a vacancy in the state Senate or House occurred on or after October 1 of the year before the
    regular election, the seat would remain vacant until the next regular election, and

    • vacant seats could be filled without an election if only one candidate is running for the vacant
    seat.

A “NO” vote opposes amending the state constitution with regard to filling legislative vacancies, leaving existing law in place requiring a special election to fill any vacancies. 


For More Information Visit This Website: Alabama Ballot Measures - ballotpedia


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